Teen Driving Habits: Research From the CDC

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), young people between the ages of 15 and 24 constitute only 14% of the U.S. population, but they make up 30% of the total costs of motor vehicle injuries to males, and 28% of the total costs of motor vehicle injuries to females. This amounts to some $26 billion in motor vehicle injury costs.

In 2013, the most recent year for which statistics regarding teenage drivers are available, over 2,100 teenagers between the ages of 16 and 19 were killed and over 243,000 were injured in motor vehicle accidents. In 2013, males between the ages of 15 and 24 had a motor vehicle death rate that was almost twice the rate of females in the same age range. Furthermore, the risk of a motor vehicle crash increases with the number of teenager passengers that a teenage driver has in his or her vehicle at any given time.

Aside from the presence of other teenage passengers, there are various other factors that increase the risk of motor vehicle crashes among teenage drivers. Some of these factors include the following:

  • Teens underestimate hazardous driving situations.
  • Teens tend to speed and allow a shorter distance between vehicles than is recommended.
  • Teens often drink and drive and have a very low rate of seatbelt usage.
  • Most accidents involving teens occur on weekends and in the late afternoon and evening hours.

When you or a family member suffers serious injuries from a motor vehicle crash or any other type of accident, and another’s negligence caused the accident, you may have a personal injury claim under Wisconsin law. Call Boller & Vaughan today at (608) 268-0268, or contact us online at www.bollervaughan.com in order to set up an appointment with one of our Wisconsin personal injury attorneys, and see what we can do for you.