Elder Care Impacts Women’s Ability to Work

A recent New York Time article discussed the reasons behind lower rates of women participating in the workforce around the turn of the century, after 50 years of steadily increasing numbers. The consensus seemed to be the fact that women primarily care for children, and many of them have left the workforce in order to do so, often due to the lack of guaranteed parental leave and the high costs of childcare. The author of this article, however, argues that our country is headed toward an elder care crisis, and that the decline of women in the workforce may very well be attributable to the need to care for aging loved ones.

According to the United Nations, 15% of the American population is of retirement age. This translates into one retired person for every four working persons. Furthermore, 14 million of these older individuals are unable to live independently and/or care for themselves. The burden of this care tends to fall disproportionately on the shoulders of elder Americans’ wives and children. About 25% of women between the ages of 45 and 64 care for an older relative in some respect, as well as one out of every seven of women between the ages of 35 and 44.

Elder care is not an easy subject to broach with your loved ones, but you should take steps to plan for needed long-term care before it becomes necessary. This is the case both with respect to paying for long-term care and determining the different options available to provide the care that is needed. Aside from choosing and paying for long-term care, there are countless situations that can lead to the abuse or neglect of elderly loved ones by caregivers. If you or a loved one is injured in any way as a result of elder abuse, or your family has suffered the loss of a loved one due to negligence by a nursing home or assisted living facility staff, you may be entitled to compensation. This inquiry involves determining which party or entity was at fault for the accident, acted negligently, or otherwise caused the incident that led to your injuries or your loved one’s death. At Boller & Vaughan, our Madison assisted living facility and nursing home elder abuse lawyers can help you with these determinations, and support you through any personal injury or wrongful death claims that you may have.